OCTOBER 3-4 EIGHTEENTHSUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST

ISAIAH 5:1-7; PSALM 80:7-15; PHILLIPPIANS 3:4B-14; MATTHEW 21:33-46.

In today’s gospel reading, Jesus tells a vineyard parable, which serves as an image of Israel, the prophets’ mission, and Christ’s death. For Christians, the vineyard also speaks of God’s love poured out in the blood of Christ, given to us for the forgiveness of sin.  Grafted onto Christ the vine at baptism, we are nourished with wine and bread so that we may share Christ’s sufferings and know the power of his resurrection.

OCTOBER 10-11 NINETEENTH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST 

ISAIAH 25:1-9; PSALM 23; PHILIPPIANS 4:1-9; MATTHEW 22:1-14.

In Isaiah we are given a vision of the great feast to come, when God will wipe away death forever. In Jesus’ parable about a great banquet, those invited do not come, so the invitation is extended to others. In our liturgy God spreads a table before us. Even amid anxiety and hardship we rejoice in the peace of God which surpasses all understanding. With great joy we feast at the table of the Lord, and we go forth to share the wonderful invitation with others hungering and thirsting for the abundant life of God.

OCTOBER 17-18  TWENTIETH SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST 

In today’s first reading God uses the Gentile ruler Cyrus to accomplish divine purposes. When the Pharisees try to trap Jesus, he tells them to give the emperor what belongs to him and to God what belongs to God. To gather for worship reminds us that our ultimate allegiance is to God rather than to any earthly authority. Created in the image of God, we offer our entire selves in the service of God and for the sake of the world.

OCTOBER 24-25 TWENTY FIRST SUNDAY AFTER PENTECOST 

EZEKIEL 18:1-4, 25-32, PSALM 25:1-9, PHILIPPIANS 2:1-13, MATTHEW 21:23-32

Jesus’ summary of the law in today’s gospel echoes our first reading from Leviticus. We are called not only to love God with heart, soul, and mind, but also to love our neighbor as ourselves. It is out of such deep care that Paul shares the gospel with the Thessalonian community. In the confession of sins, we acknowledge that we have not loved God, neighbor, and self; yet we gather to hear the word of forgiveness and to be strengthened by word and meal to be signs of God’s love and mercy in the world.

 

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